5@5: Vilsack targets GMO labeling cost | Nestle commits to cage free

[email protected]: Vilsack targets GMO labeling cost | Nestle commits to cage free

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Vilsack to host January meeting on GMO food labeling issues

USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack said there is growing urgency to reach a compromise with Vermont’s law that would require labels on foods that contain genetically modified organisms expected to take effect in July 2016. If Vermont’s initiative withstands a legal challenge, proponents say it could give momentum to similar measures being considered in more than a dozen other states. Read more at KTIC radio...


Nestle to switch to cage-free eggs in U.S. by 2020

Nestle SA said on Tuesday it will stop using eggs laid by caged hens in its U.S. products by 2020, making it the largest packaged food company to go cage-free amid pressure from consumers and animal-rights groups. Read more at Producer...

Why giving people easy access to a supermarket doesn't improve their health

There's nothing wrong with building a supermarket per se. But obesity and other public health problems are knotty and can't be solved so simply. Read more at Munchies...


Documents reveal Canadian teenager target of GMO lobby

At the time, Rachel Parent was 14 years old and had a growing social media following. Her message to label genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food was attracting attention – including from those who promote GMOs in the U.S. Their internal emails reveal they were discussing how they could counter her message. Read more at Global News...


Nutrition supplement maker to locate facility in Kentucky

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says a British company that specializes in making sports nutrition supplements plans to open a production facility in central Kentucky, bringing up to 350 jobs. Read more from WHAS 11...

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