The creepiest new way to play with your food

The creepiest new way to play with your food

Once you take a look at the photo below, bobbing for apples and staging peep fights in the microwave seem positively innocent ways to play with one's food.

The Lobster Zone

I discovered The Lobster Zone while attending a bar and concert house in Golden, Colo. There, nestled into the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, sits this vending machine/arcade game that I couldn't wrap my head around except to think: unbelievable. Like, GMOs in foods being called "natural" unbelievable.

What's more, as my friends and I stood in stunned belief, the "game" went into demonstration mode. The claw dropped down into the pool of lobsters, scattering them away from its grip. Then, it traveled back up to the chute where the lobster is released, only to slide all the way down a chute to your feet.

A sticker next to the chute's output warns you not to make contact with the lobster's claws, because after you fish out the lobster, you have to pick it up and take it to the bar's kitchen to be cooked.

"The Lobster Zone offers a great business opportunity in a break-out niche," reads the machine's website. Well, that's one way to look at it.

Who knows how long these lobsters have remained in their tank, if they've been certified safe to eat, how often their water is changed, or even how often someone plays this "game?" All of it seems undeniably creepy to me, and not just because I'm a vegan. In America, we are so disassociated from our food supply that we've reduced it to entertainment and not nourishment. Who suffers more: us or the lobsters?

What do you think about The Lobster Zone? Tell me in the comments.

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