Crofter's Organics' new Superfruit Spreads


Gerhard and Gabi Latka, founders of Crofter's Organics, have taught me more about jam than I ever thought there was to know. Beginning with the startling realization that when I was eating the company's new line of superfruit delights, comprised of exotic, antioxidant-rich fruits from across the globe, I was not eating a jam at all. These are spreads. That of course led to my next startling realization that there's actually a difference. Preserves, jams, and jellies must contain at least 65 percent soluble solids--aka sugar. A spread, however, contains only 44 percent sugar. Lesson learned: You really must consider feeding your kids a "peanut butter and spread." (Or read on for some far more innovative spread-based ideas.)

In addition to containing less sugar than their counterparts, Crofter's Superfruit Spreads are packed with flavor and antioxidants from blueberries, yumberries, black currants, pomegranates, and maqui berries. This led me to my third discovery: Crofter's could easily become my next dietary staple. So when Gabi offered me breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert suggestions to make with the four flavors (each spread is associated with a continent and goes by that name: Asia, North America, South America, and Europe), I popped open a bottle-or four-and began experimenting with the spreads. Here are some of Gabi's innovative suggestions, many of which I have tested (and approved).

Spread it one on a waffle (just put North America on my flax waffles the other day). Do the same with French toast.

Add a teaspoon to salad dressing for sweetness

Spread it onto a cheescake

Use it to fill crepes

Even add some to a turkey meatloaf

My favorite is using it in this delicious, simple bite-sized dessert (reminiscent of an after-dinner cheese and fruit platter) with just three elements: Water crackers, ricotta or mascarpone, and your Crofter's spread of choice.

Come up with any new ways to use a spread? Let us know!!

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