NBJ Blog

Greening U.S. Businesses & the Nutrition Industry

At the NBJ Summit this week, we'll be hosting a panel on "greening" the nutrition industry. Below are a few articles I found on Brandweek.com that caught my attention. They represent a solid balance of perspectives on this challenging, and very new issue for executives. The jury is still out on the longevity of "greening", but I hope to have some solid suggestions on what to do and what not to do following the NBJ Summit.


Study: 'Green' Products Leave Consumers Puzzled

"The good news is consumers are "going green." But the bad news is they are still pretty green when it comes to understanding what the term really means.

"Here's the big ah-ha!," said Suzanne Shelton, CEO of Shelton Group, a Knoxville, Tenn.-based ad agency that specializes in energy efficiency and sustainability. "If you were an alien and you landed on the planet in April of this year, you would think that the 'green' market was pretty mature because you'd be hearing about it everywhere—every newspaper, every TV show you turn on somebody is talking about being green. But this is not a mature market."

Shelton Group recently conducted a national study, called Eco Pulse, which asked consumers open-ended and multiple-choice questions about green issues. What it found was a whole lot of confusion."

Do Consumers Care that Sun Chips are Solar Powered? Apparently

"It’s getting harder to find a brand that doesn’t claim to be green. But, do they have a solar power factory? Is the rest of their energy use offset by energy credits? And, are they rebuilding a town that was virtually wiped out by a tornado? Not likely.

Sun Chips is different. The Frito-Lay product has rooted its brand in environmental causes as well as health-forward thinking. This strategy has paid off handsomely as Sun Chip sales are up 17.6%, totaling $201.8 million for the 52 weeks ending June 15, per IRI.

Frito-Lay vp-marketing Gannon Jones talked to Brandweek news editor Kenneth Hein about why really being green is healthy for sales."

Forget the Environment Say the 'Never Greens'

"About 10% of the population are Never Greens, according to a survey by Mintel International in Chicago, a research firm.

The Never Greens don't buy green products, don't remember green advertising when they see it and are irritated by it even if they do."

TAGS: Green Living
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