Making healthy food cool

Making healthy food cool

Chef Ann Cooper's current work to overhaul the quality of the lunch program within the Boulder Valley School District is but another reason I love living in the healthy Boulder bubble. But even in veggie-loving Boulder, students (and their parents) are resisting jumping on board the "real school food cooked from scratch" bandwagon because, well, some say the fare is too bland and not very kid-friendly.

"Things that taste good aren't necessarily good for us—and things that are good for us don't necessarily taste good," BVSD school board President Ken Roberge told the Boulder Daily Camera last month. "Tastes are, to some extent, learned. The trick is to make things that are good for us taste good, and then teach our kids to eat them."

Aside from the fact that children are often raised to like only very salty or sweet food, the problem here is that healthy food simply isn't cool, right? Wrong—at least that's the premise behind a new ad campaign for baby carrots. The objective behind the $25 million campaign, which is being paid for by "a bunch of carrot farmers," is to convince kids and teens that baby carrots are junk food, even if they do supply lots of good vitamins.


While part of me laments the fact that carrots require this kind of "tongue-in-cheek" marketing, another part of me thinks the campaign is actually a pretty ingenious and darn-right funny way to get kids (and their parents) to think about healthy food in new ways.
What do you think?
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