Real food redux

I just read this January 17 New York Times interview with Michael Pollen, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and, more recently, In Defense of Food (which offers the simple directive, "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants"). I especially loved the last paragraph of the interview, where Pollen says:

"The big challenge is that you do have to cook. A lot of us are intimidated by cooking today. We watch cooking shows on TV but we cook very little. We’re turning cooking into a spectator sport. This process of outsourcing our food preparation to large corporations, which is what we’ve been doing the last 50 years, is a big part of our problem. We’re seduced by convenience. You’re going to have to put a little more time and effort into preparing your food. I’m trying to get across how pleasurable that can be. It needn’t be a chore. It can be incredibly rewarding to move food closer to the center of your life."

Eat real food and eat well -- this has ALWAYS been Delicious Living's message. "Convenience" foods, while vastly improved from years past, won't bring you joy or health in the long term; there's simply something inherently healthy about cooking real food, in real time, and enjoying it with real gusto. I hope our recipes help you do that.

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