Resveratrol does indeed help diabetics

For diabetics, resveratrol may help control the glycemic levels, according to a recent meta-analysis.

Resveratrol, the substance found in red grapes and wine helps diabetics but doesn’t affect glycemic measures in people without the disease, according to a recent strategic search of literature.

The research was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The authors scoured online journals like PubMed and MEDLINE for randomized controlled trials that estimated the effects of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity. Eleven studies, including 388 subjects, were found to include in the meta-analysis.

They found that resveratrol consumption significantly reduced fasting glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin resistance (measured by using the homeostatic model assessment) levels in participants with diabetes. They found no significant effect of resveratrol on glycemic measures of non-diabetic participants. Additional studies are needed, they said.

Studies of resveratrol’s effect on other health issues have shown promise for the compound. The substance may have the potential to protect against hearing and cognitive decline, according to a published laboratory study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

In an analysis of 446 compounds for their the ability to boost the innate immune system in humans, researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University discovered just two that stood out from the crowd—the resveratrol found in red grapes and a compound called pterostilbene from blueberries.

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