Statins at the heart of U.S. cardiac trouble

Popular statin drugs both deplete the body of critical vitamin K2 and also cause atherosclerosis, doing more harm than good, according to a recent review of more clinical evidence.

Statins are breaking our hearts, according to more research that suggests the blockbuster drugs do more harm than good. Popular drugs like Crestor and Lipitor actually cause arteries to calcify and can be toxic to heart muscles, suggests a recent roundup of research, complete with extensive explanation of the mechanisms by which the drugs do their harm, published in the journal Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology.
How could America’s beloved statins hurt us? According to the research, the drugs foil the body’s ability to make vitamin K2. That vitamin is needed to protect arteries from calcifying through a process called matrix Gla-protein activation. Statins also act as toxins that suck coenzyme Q10 from our systems. CoQ10 is the power plant driving every cell, particularly cells in the heart. So, with statins, your arteries will harden and your heart will weaken. On the bright side, you’ll have a fabulous cholesterol profile. You can put in on your epitaph.
The article’s authors gathered pharmacological and biochemical studies that “reveal the mechanisms of statins to stimulate atherogenesis and heart failure, and some clinical studies support this interpretation.” They include the Japan Lipid Intervention Trial with included 41,800 people, a trial that studied 10,510 U.S. veterans over five years and a large scale Danish study of cancer patients that lasted 15 years.
The authors summarize their findings: “Statins are not only ineffective in preventing CHD events but instead are capable of increasing CHD and heart failure...The epidemic of heart failure and atherosclerosis that plagues the modern world may paradoxically be aggravated by the pervasive use of statin drugs. We propose that current statin treatment guidelines be critically reevaluated.”

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