Is a new organization to define 'natural' a good idea?

Is a new organization to define 'natural' a good idea?

Does "natural" need a makeover? Does the term need to be defined? And who would do the defining? Michele Simon examines the issue and looks at a new organization that’s made news for declaring its intention to define "natural." What do you think? Do we need a group like this to step in and create one definition for the entire industry?

A new organization that’s yet to even formally announce itself made news for declaring its intention to define natural. The new group, called the Organic and Natural Health Association, plans to hold a series of meetings as part of a transparent process that engages consumers as well as industry.

At a time when more shoppers than ever are seeking healthier products, the natural products industry is coming under increasing pressure to define the squishy term. No wonder, with so many food companies jumping on the “all natural” bandwagon, sometimes for products that bear little resemblance to anything found in nature, leaving many consumers confused and often duped.

Meanwhile the Food and Drug Administration has made it painfully clear it has no intention of defining natural, and given the undue political influence in Washington, that’s probably a good thing.

As I wrote about for New Hope Natural Media last year, in the wake of FDA inaction, class action lawyers have been filing lawsuits against food companies that use the natural label in a deceptive manner. Whatever you might think of this approach, in some cases it has forced manufacturers to do the right thing. For example, as a result of being sued over GMO ingredients in its “all natural” cereals and snacks, Barbara’s Bakery is now obtaining third party verification from the Non-GMO Project.

But litigation is not a long-term solution to an industrywide problem. So maybe the time has come for someone to step up?

I recently spoke to Karen Howard, the new group’s director, who explained that ONHA’s structure is unique in that it includes representation from both industry and consumers, and that the mission is much larger than just defining natural. The group will set standards for natural certification in four sectors: food, pet food, supplements and cosmetics, in just 90 days from its first open meeting at the Supply Side West trade show in October. When I asked Howard about undercutting organic standards, she told me the group is “100 percent committed to organic” and that the natural certification will complement organic, not replace it.

Still, many questions remain, such as how will this intersect with existing guidelines, such as those from Whole Foods Market or New Hope’s own standards department? And will this new certification process truly educate consumers or will yet another seal on a box just add to the confusion? Also, will companies even participate? If they don’t, lawsuits are likely to continue to fill the void.

So what do you think? Do we need a group like this to step in and create one definition of natural for the entire industry?

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