Nutrition Business Journal

Stuart Rothenberg to speak at CRN's annual event

The presidential nominees have been chosen, and the excitement surrounding the 2008 presidential election will come to a fever pitch in the months leading up to November’s big showdown between Sen. John McCain and Sen. Barack Obama. 


If you are wondering what this election outcome and the pertinent congressional races will mean for the dietary supplement industry, plan to attend CRN’s The Conference to hear political guru Stuart Rothenberg put it all in perspective.

As the editor and publisher of a biweekly political newsletter, The Rothenberg Political Report, Mr. Rothenberg is widely regarded as one of the nation’s keenest minds when it comes to analyzing U.S. elections and political trends. On Saturday, Oct. 4, at The Conference, he will share his insights with dietary supplement industry executives in a session titled “2008 Political Outlook – What Does it Mean for Your Business?”

Mr. Rothenberg will address the likely results of the presidential elections as well as focus on key congressional races, and discuss how the balance of power in Washington, D.C. could change—or not—based on the 2008 national and state election results.

In addition to his own political newsletter, Mr. Rothenberg writes a twice weekly column in Roll Call and has contributed pieces to The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. His political expertise has been on display on NBC’s Meet the Press and ABC’s Nightline, and in the past, Mr. Rothenberg has served as a political analyst for both CBS and CNN.

The Conference is being held October 2-5, at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa located approximately 31 miles/30 minutes outside of Albuquerque. Registration for the event is available online. Visit for more information.

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