Patagonia's 'Unbroken Ground' highlights food done right

Unbroken Ground from Patagonia Provisions on Vimeo.

From Food Inc. to Fast Food Nation, many of the most well-known food documentaries illuminate how our modern food system is a detriment to the environment: Modern industrial agriculture leaches nutrients from the soil. Cattle raised in factory farms emit massive amounts of climate change-causing methane gas. Nitrogen run-off creates dead-zones in ocean habitats.

There is a lot wrong with food production. But we think Patagonia’s new short documentary, "Unbroken Ground," is notable because it highlights food producers across the spectrum who practice regenerative farming. In the video above, meet the folks at the Land Institute who are experimenting with perennial wheat varieties, which have long, sturdy roots that sequester carbon from the atmosphere into the soil. Meet Wyoming ranchers who restore prairies by raising bison, and researchers in Washington breeding grains specifically for organic farmers.

“We believe in the work and passion the people in 'Unbroken Ground' bring to changing how food is produced,” said Birgit Cameron, director of Patagonia Provisions, in a statement. “As our business grows, we’re committed to developing partnerships with like-minded farmers, ranchers, fishermen, scientists and chefs to create delicious food that’s good for both people and planet.”

To say the least, this video is pretty inspiring, and represents Patagonia’s continuing commitment to educate about (and produce through Patagonia Provisions) foods that can have a measurable, positive impact on the environment.

As founder Yvon Chouinard says, “Putting a small group together all believing in the same thing, all going in one direction. You can’t believe what we could accomplish with that.”

We couldn’t agree more.

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