September issue preview: Condition specific guide

When product developers, formulators and marketers at manufacturing companies look for an angle of their next product launch, chances are they're looking at a direct consumer benefit they can capitalize on. So if you're mulling your next boffo product, check out our damn good advice on each of 15 health conditions.

Two years ago now we here at Functional Ingredients decided that run-of-the-mill supplier directories weren't the way the real world really worked. Retailers don't stock store shelves alphabetically by company name. Consumers don't make up shopping lists alphabetically either — they know there's an area of their bodies that need support, and they look for supplements, functional foods, and innovative beverages, even natural cosmetics, to support that good aim.

When product developers, formulators and marketers at manufacturing companies look for an angle of their next product launch, chances are they're looking at a direct consumer benefit they can capitalize on. So if you're mulling your next boffo product, check out our damn good advice on each of 15 health conditions. Then, look to our list of the leading industry suppliers who can help you get there.

In this E-dition of Functional Ingredients, we offer you a quick sneak peek at some of the editorial that can help educate you in the ingredients to consider in your next new product launch or re-launch.

In the September issue of FI — look for it on your desk any day now — each health condition will also contains a chart of sales data in that particular condition, courtesy of SPINS, which reports sales information in natural and mainstream stores (sans Walmart and Whole Foods Market) on 430 ingredients and 80 consumer health concerns. Most of this sales data is from supplements, though foods or beverages get counted if they explicitly state a health concern — Vitaminwater's Energy would count ribose, for example.

As a nod to SPINS' innovative health concern coding IP, I should mention that SPINS' data could be useful if you want to see which health concern is growing, or even which area of the country is growing a particular health condition — helpful if you're thinking about starting with a limited regional distribution.

Read it and reap!

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish