Beet-based bevs burgeoning among athletes

Popularity of beet-based beverages is growing among younger, more active demographic, reports

A far cry from bubbe’s borscht, beetroot drinks are gaining traction among a younger and more active consumer. The red stuff’s on the rise, reports
Mintel reports that new beverages with beet as an ingredient have risen steadily since 2012, when research surfaced about how beets may enhance athletic performance. Reported benefits include everything from increased endurance to improved blood and oxygen flow to muscles. Mintel didn’t give a number, but analysis of data from the market research firm indicated that percentages of new product launches have nearly double from 2012 to 2014. Beets are also filling bottles and cans of the categories hottest sectors, like high pressure processed juices and other premium-priced juice products.
Nitrate-rich beetroot juice may be the secret sauce behind the Auburn Tiger’s incredible turnaround, reported the Wall Street Journal last year. Before every game, between warm-ups and the opening kick-off, players dump little pouches of beetroot concentrate into their water bottle and chug. It may be fueling the team’s success, but not all are particularly fond of the stuff. “The worst thing in the entire world, Auburn tight end C.J. Uzomah, told the WSJ. “It is nasty.”
Boulder, Colorado-based Red Ace Organics was the first brand to position beetroot juice as a performance supplement upon its launch in 2013, packing three USDA organic beets in a 2 oz. supplement shot. Red Ace is now available in all regions of Whole Foods Markets nationwide, and recently gained additional national distribution through UNFI. “When we were creating our product, we were focused solely on the athletic community,” William Leslie IV, co-founder of Red Ace, told
“But then we learned that we have something much more powerful. Marathoners use our product, sure. But people concerned with blood pressure or inflammation also take Red Ace every day.”
Whether as chewy shots or sippable drinks, according to, “beet juice as a product appears in prime position to capitalize on the current health-conscious trends of the food and beverage industry.”

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