New data show KoACT superior for bone health

New data show KoACT superior for bone health

Research suggests AIDP's proprietary formulation of calcium and collagen is optimal for bone strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women.

Data presented at April's Experimental Biology 2014 Annual Scientific Meeting shows that KoACT, a dietary supplement that combines a proprietary formulation of calcium and collagen, is optimal for bone strength and flexibility in postmenopausal women. The research was conducted by Bahram H. Arjmandi, Ph. D, RD, who is currently Margaret A. Sitton Named Professor and Chair of the Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences at The Florida State University (FSU).

Dr. Jennifer Gu, AIDP's vice president of research and development, said, "Conventional thinking often entails the use of calcium and Vitamin D supplements; however, these random controlled clinical studies on KoACT demonstrate that calcium alone is not the best option. It is medically important for post-menopausal women to know that achieving optimal bone health requires using a product, like KoACT, that 'mimics Mother Nature' in stopping bone loss by helping to build bone strength. Calcium alone is not the right answer.”

KoACT, which has been independently validated by human trials, is "one big step in the right direction" post-menopausal women should take for achieving both bone strength and flexibility.

The study presented at Experimental Biology 2014 reports the long-term efficacy of KoACT in supporting bone health in postmenopausal women. Thirty-nine women were randomly assigned to receive either 5 grams of KoACT containing 500 milligrams of elemental calcium and 200 IU of vitamin D or 500 milligrams of calcium in the form of calcium carbonate and 200 IU of vitamin D (control). Total bone mineral density (BMD) and BMD of the lumbar spine and hip were evaluated at baseline, six months and 12 months using duel-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Blood was collected at baseline, six and 12 months to assess serum biomarkers of bone turnover. KoACT prevented the loss of whole-body BMD (KoACT: -0.004 vs control: -0.011; P < 0.05) at 12 months when compared to control. The KoACT group had reduced levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5B) at six months (P < 0.05) and higher bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) /TRAP5B ratio at six months (P < 0.05) and tended to be higher at 12 months whereas there were no changes in control.

 

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