Peak ATP boosts post-workout blood flow

Peak ATP boosts post-workout blood flow

Human trial shows adenosine triphosphate may aid recovery and nutrient delivery.

A newly published study shows for the first time that oral administration of adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) increases post-workout blood flow and could spur an entirely new generation of preworkout “pump supplements”—not only superior for its blood flow promoting properties, but for its effectiveness in smaller (400 mg) versus gram doses.

Authored by leading sports supplement researchers Jacob M. Wilson and Ralf Jâger, the Journal of International Society of Sports Nutrition (JISSN) published study examined the effects of oral ATP on both humans and animals. In both cases, results confirm that orally supplemented adenosine triphosphate stimulates vasodilation following exercise.

In the study on humans, 12 college-age, resistance-trained athletes were given 400 mg of ATP (patented Peak ATP® provided by TSI USA Inc., Missoula, Mont.) daily for 12 weeks prior to an acute arm exercise—at weeks one, four, eight and 12. Ultrasonography determined post-workout tests on volumetric blood flow and blood vessel dilation in the brachial artery of the arm showed significantly elevated blood flow, along with statistically significant elevations in brachial (arm) dilation in as little as one week.

Recent studies have increased awareness of Peak ATP as an effective ingredient in muscle mass increases, strength and power through improvements in muscular excitability.

“The benefits of Peak ATP match consumer need exactly because athletes want to optimize the effects of their hard training,” said Larry Kolb, president of TSI USA Inc. “Having blood flow as one of the mechanisms-of-action of oral ATP allows us to communicate not only the benefits, but now offer a compelling ‘how-to’ story that is unique in the marketplace.”

With significant periodized increases in blood flow, the study offers clinical proof that branded supplementation with Peak ATP in resistance-trained athletes increases post-exercise blood flow, and may be particularly effective during exercise recovery, when rapid nutrient delivery to muscles is critical.

“These findings inform the future of post-workout supplements,” said Kolb. “From speeding the rate of recovery to easing muscle fatigue, the possibilities are wide open.”

For a more complete look at the science behind Peak ATP—including a newly produced video work on “muscle excitability”—please visit


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