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Colorado GMO labeling initiative makes November ballot

Proposition 105 asks voters if foods modified or treated with genetically modified materials should be labeled "Produced With Genetic Engineering" starting July 1, 2016. The Colorado Secretary of State’s office announced on Aug. 20 that nearly 125,000 valid signatures were received, giving the Right to Know Colorado campaign 145 percent of the number of signatures required for placement on the ballot.

Right to Know Colorado proudly reports the GMO labeling initiative, which helps Coloradans make informed decisions about the foods they choose for their families, will be on the ballot this November 4. The voter initiative requires the labeling of genetically modified or GMO foods, and will appear on the Colorado statewide ballot as Proposition 105.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s office announced on August 20 that nearly 125,000 valid signatures were received, giving the Right to Know Colorado campaign 145% of the number of signatures required for placement on the ballot. Right to Know Colorado submitted a total of 171,370 signatures by the August 4 deadline, with a 73% validity rate.

"This historic achievement is only possible because of the thousands of hours volunteers contributed to this effort," said Right to Know Colorado campaign Chair Larry Cooper. “We had more than 500 people collect signatures throughout the state with signatures from every county in the state. The people of Colorado made this happen."

"Thank you again to the hundreds of volunteers and the 171,370 people who signed in support of labeling GMOs," said campaign issue committee Co-chair Tryna Cooper. "Now we look toward to November and need your support. Go to our website at RighttoKnowColorado.org, donate, volunteer, get involved, and vote YES on 105!"

Reflecting a July 2013 New York Times poll showing that a great majority (93%) of Americans are in favor of mandatory GMO labeling, a recent independent survey in the state of Colorado shows that 75% of Colorado registered voters would vote yes to require labeling of foods made with genetically engineered ingredients sold in the state.

Proposition 105 asks voters if foods modified or treated with genetically modified materials should be labeled "Produced With Genetic Engineering" starting July 1, 2016. 

"If GMOs are safe, as companies say, then why not label them on food?" said Larry Cooper. "Coloradans should not be left in the dark about what they are feeding their families."

About GMO Labeling

With no federal GMO labeling requirements in place in the U.S., it is estimated that more than 80% of conventional processed foods contain genetically engineered ingredients, primarily from GMO corn, soy, canola, cotton, sugar beets and other GMO crops. However, according to a July 2013 New York Times  poll, 93% of Americans are in favor of mandatory GMO labeling. More than 64 other countries require mandatory labeling of genetically engineered foods. Colorado joins more than two dozen other states, including Oregon, Arizona, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania and elsewhere, in calling for GMO labeling legislation. Mandatory GMO labeling laws were recently passed in Vermont, Maine and Connecticut.

About Right to Know Colorado

Right to Know Colorado GMO is a grassroots campaign to achieve mandatory labeling of genetically engineered foods or GMOs across the state. Right to Know Colorado is built on the foundation that we have the basic right to know what is in our food and what we are feeding our families. The campaign gives Coloradans the opportunity to make informed decisions about their diet, health, and general lifestyle.

Food labels list and describe nearly every detailed component of the food product, from the caloric values and processing information, to the fat and protein content and the known allergens. Adding a simple label for GMO ingredients would fulfill Colorado consumers’ right to know, enabling them to make educated food purchases and dietary choices for themselves and their families.

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