CRN applauds FTC action against deceptive weight-loss products

CRN applauds FTC action against deceptive weight-loss products

CRN supports FTC’s efforts to crackdown on companies making outrageous claims.

The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the dietary supplement industry’s leading trade association, commends the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for its initiative against deceptive advertising of weight-loss products. FTC  announced "Operation Failed Resolution," which includes cases against four companies making unfounded or misleading claims, as well as resources for media and consumers to help them recognize implausible claims that can cost consumers millions of dollars and harm consumers by encouraging them to postpone the truly effective, healthful things they should do to lose weight.

“CRN supports FTC’s efforts to crackdown on those companies making outrageous claims. All products marketed for weight-loss, whether they are sold as dietary supplements, food additives, cosmetics or homeopathic drugs, are required to have evidence that substantiates the claims they make,” said CRN President and CEO Steve Mister. “FTC’s announcement is also a good reminder to consumers that if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” he added.

CRN recommends consumers avoid quick fixes and magic bullets. “It’s no secret that the best way to lose weight is to focus on gradual weight loss over time through healthy eating, regular exercise and supplementing as appropriate,” Mr. Mister said. “There are beneficial weight management dietary supplements on the market, and supplements also help fill nutrient gaps for those people not getting all the nutrients they need from food alone. Whether it’s a topical cream, a dietary supplement, or a diet plan, consumers should be wary of products that promise to make weight loss easy.”    

Additional tips for consumers are available, along with an accompanying video, on CRN’s website:

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