CRN hosts webinar on vitamin benefits, safety

CRN hosts webinar on vitamin benefits, safety

“Are Vitamins Worth It? The Science Behind Benefits, Safety and Health Care Cost Savings” will take place Feb. 13.

The Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the leading trade association for the dietary supplement industry, announced it will hold the next in its series of free webinars for pharmacists and nurse practitioners in partnership with Skipta, the premier closed-loop social networking platform for medical professionals. The webinar, “Are Vitamins Worth It? The Science Behind Benefits, Safety and Health Care Cost Savings,” will take place on Feb. 13 at noon Eastern, and will also be available on demand following the live event.

CRN’s president and CEO Steve Mister, along with CRN’s senior vice president, scientific and regulatory affairs, Duffy MacKay, N.D., will discuss recent news coverage about vitamins and will also examine how these products are regulated. Further, the webinar will include results that demonstrate potential health care cost savings from specific dietary supplements as reported in an economic report from Frost & Sullivan titled, “Smart Prevention—Health Care Cost Savings Resulting from the Targeted Use of Dietary Supplements.” The report was commissioned by the CRN Foundation. In addition to the CRN presentations, there will be a question and answer segment.

“We’ve done several of these webinars with Pharmacist Society and Generation NP and found that participants are very engaged, ask smart questions, and seem to be appreciative of our perspective,” CRN’s senior vice president, communications, Judy Blatman said. “Our last webinar through Skipta was a joint webinar on calcium safety and benefits with the National Osteoporosis Foundation and about 200 health care practitioners participated. As long as pharmacists and nurse practitioners find value in these webinars, we’ll continue to make ourselves available.”  

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