Despite Prop 65 lawsuit, sales going strong among fish oil suppliers

<p>Six months after an organization filed a lawsuit against eight makers and sellers of fish and shark oil supplements, under California's Proposition 65 law, fish oil sales continue to go strong, according to the latest data by SPINS.</p>

Six months after an organization filed a lawsuit against eight makers and sellers of fish and shark oil supplements, under California's Proposition 65 law, fish oil sales continue to go strong, according to the latest data by SPINS.

An independent testing agency has also released the results of its PCB tests on 24 fish, algal and krill oil supplements, and reported one offending product.

Between August 2009 and August 2010, sales of products containing natural fish oil concentrates increased 25% in the US food, drug and mass-market channel to $270 million. In the previous year period, sales rose 22.5%, from $176 million to $215.6 million.

The lawsuit was filed March 2 by the Mateel Environmental Justice Foundation. According to the group, a handful of fish oil products they tested have PCB contamination above the so-called 'safe harbor' limit for human PCB consumption under the Prop 65 law.

Since the lawsuit was filed, things have been happening "behind the scenes," insiders say, but no official developments have been announced.

Meanwhile, on Sept. 28, ConsumerLab.com announced the results of its quality tests on fish, algal and krill oil supplements. Of the 24 products tested, one product for pets contained PCB levels that exceeded the testing organization's strict contamination limit for dioxin-like PCBs of 3 picograms per gram (3 parts per trillion).

The supplement — 1-800-PetMeds Super Omega 3 for Cats and Dogs — registered at 3.14 picograms per gram, which is an exposure level "still very small compared to that from fish meat. A small serving (3oz) of fatty fish such as salmon may easily provide 170 picograms of dl-PCBs, as well as a significant amount of mercury," ConsumerLab.com reported.
Trace amounts of dl-PCBs were found in all the supplements.

To purchase the complete report, visit www.consumerlab.com.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish