NASC introduces new seal

NASC introduces new seal

National Animal Supplement Council announces the completion of a strategic campaign to improve the brand equity of the NASC Quality Seal.

National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) announces the completion of a strategic campaign to improve the brand equity of the NASC Quality Seal, which has resulted in an updated image and new NASC Corporate Partner Seal that will be utilized by approved third-party suppliers.

"The board's intention behind this update is to expand awareness of NASC's quality systems among consumers," says Karen Howard, president of NASC who presented the updated seal to members at NASC's annual conference in May. "For more than 10 years, NASC has worked diligently to create a unique path for animal supplements to go to market and define standards for the product supply chain that ensure retailers and consumers can trust animal supplements with the NASC Quality Seal. Now we are poised to broadly expand our outreach to consumers and engage them in the responsibility of providing healthy supplements to the animals we love."

NASC's Quality Seal program ensures that companies displaying the seal have passed a comprehensive facility audit, have a written quality control manual, utilize an adverse event reporting system and follow proper label guidelines including warnings and caution statements suggested by regulatory agencies.

"Buying animal supplements bearing the NASC Quality Seal is the best way to ensure products are coming from a trustworthy source," says Howard. "Our goal is to make sure consumers and retailers know that."

The updated NASC Quality Seal will be integrated on approved audited member company product labels over the next six months and consumers can expect to see the updated seal on shelves as early as this fall. Howard anticipates that within 18 months all audited NASC members will be using the updated NASC Quality Seal.

"Our next step is to develop and launch a consumer awareness campaign about the NASC Quality Seal and educate consumers on the value of animal health supplements," says Howard. "Our research shows that although people are becoming more concerned for the overall health and wellness of their companion animals, information on nutrition and health supplements for animals is limited and confusing."

 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish