5@5: Food waste = climate change? | Edible microalgae multiplying

[email protected]: Food waste = climate change? | Edible microalgae multiplying

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Reducing food waste could curb climate change

Wasted food could account for as much as one-tenth of greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to new research by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. But much of the emissions generated by the agriculture and food industries could easily be avoided by better management of the food supply chain. Read more at Take Part...


Is spirulina the new kale? A Thai startup is bringing back the tiny green algae

After learning how carbon dioxide from industrial facilities could be used to grow algae, the founder of EnerGaia began installing urban spirulina farms around Bangkok. The edible algae contains 59 to 65 percent protein and is a complete source of amino acids. Read more at The Guardian...

Retail-host restaurant trend is not without food safety concerns

In-store restaurants, like the one Whole Foods is planning in its first new 365 store, are becoming more common. They're also raising food safety concerns around licensing and inspections, biosecurity and staffing. Read more at Food Safety News...


Is antibiotic use in the U.S. livestock industry declining?

In 2011, The Pew Charitable Trusts found that four times as many antibiotics were being sold for meat and poultry production in the U.S. than for treating sick Americans. As science and consumer groups have rallied for change over the past few years, companies and restaurants have pledged to phase out meat raised with antibiotics. But a recent report found that most of the top 25 restaurant chains in the U.S. haven't made such meaningful commitments. Read more at Foodtank...


A food expert tells us what kitchens will be like in 20 years

Spoiler alert: They will have connected devices that talk to each other to help monitor inventory and prevent food waste, according to one food agency. Read more at Tech Insider...

TAGS: News General
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