5@5: 'Ugly food' movement slow to catch on in U.S. | Reviving indigenous crops

[email protected]: 'Ugly food' movement slow to catch on in U.S. | Reviving indigenous crops

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Ugly fruit and veggies are making a comeback on U.S. grocery shelves

A few U.S. grocery chains have made attempts at programs to prevent imperfect produce from being wasted, but seem to have not been so successful. Yet other stores and startups are continuing to try to develop the market. Walmart says it hasn't seen high demand for ugly fruit and veggies but is considering a pilot program this year. Here's the story of how we came to adopt such high aesthetic standards for produce and what can be done about it. Read more at The Guardian...


30 indigenous crops promoting health and contributing to food security

Re-investment in indigenous crops, like the marama plant in Africa and mungbeans in Asia, has the potential to provide a solution to loss of crop biodiversity, to improve local economies across the world and to help fight food insecurity. Read more at Food Tank...

Nearly 1,700 companies withdraw from North Carolina events in response to HB2

North Carolina’s new law limiting anti-discrimination protections has driven B Lab to move a cluster of Certified B Corporation events out of the state. “B Corps seek to build a more inclusive economy, and that is not possible with laws like HB2 on the books,” said Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B Lab. Read more at CSRwire...


French told to avoid 107 supermarket foods

Nutritionists in France researched some 800 common supermarket foods and warned that more than 100 items "should be banished" because of their additives or ingredient quality. Read more at The Local...


All-natural but still 'imitation'? The strange case of the skim milk label

A federal judge ruled that states can require added vitamins as part of their milk standards, prompting some producers to have to call their skim milk something other than, well, skim milk. Read more at NPR...

TAGS: News General
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