5@5: 'Local' goes big | When health care and healthy food work together

[email protected]: 'Local' goes big | When health care and healthy food work together

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

'Whole Foods Effect': When small food makers get the call to go big

Landing a large retail account can be a game-changer for a small brand, but upping production quickly enough while maintaining quality and consistency is a challenge. But as the popularity of local food grows—potentially to the tune of $20 billion in sales by 2019—those challenges are becoming ever more common. Can incubators and loan programs like those offered by Whole Foods and Costco help? Read more at The New York Times...


How a health clinic made a local grocery store part of its prescription

Two very different Massachusetts businesses that shared a customer base—many low-economic residents struggling with chronic health conditions—led the development of a connected health center and supermarket to help people get healthy. Doctors write “veggie scripts” for patients focused on heart health or weight loss. The store offers nutrition and cooking classes. Read more at Yes! magazine...

Vermont seeks internal GMO research from Monsanto, DuPont

Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell filed motions is a district court last week asking seed companies to release internal research on the safety and potential impacts of their genetically modified seeds. Read more at St. Louis Business Journal...


This pea-based milk is healthier than almond milk, and actually tastes almost like milk

Meet Ripple, the brainchild of Method cofounder Adam Lowry. It's a pea-based milk substitute with 8 grams of protein, plus more potassium and vitamin D than almond milk. Read more at Fast Company...


How the World Health Organization's cancer agency confuses consumers

The cancer research arm of WHO—which last year deemed processed red meat probably carcinogenic—has big influence, but some say its methods aren't widely understood. Here's the story behind the agency and how it works. Read more at Reuters...

TAGS: News General
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