5@5: When will insect protein be ready for prime time? | U.S. nutrition labels reimagined

[email protected]: When will insect protein be ready for prime time? | U.S. nutrition labels reimagined

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

When will insects be more than a novelty protein?

By now, many people are aware of the sustainability benefits of insect protein. And manufacturers are incorporating it into crackers, cookies and energy bars. But it hasn't hit its tipping point yet, and may not for some time. For one, the supply chain needs to scale. Read more at The New Food Economy...


We redesigned food labels to serve up real value

Designers at Wired took feedback from nutritionists and other experts and created their own nutrition label that incorporates a green-yellow-red rating system, puts ingredients first and adds a sustainability rating based on allergens and animal welfare. What do you think? Read more at Wired...


Food products with health claims: Only marginally better (no surprise)

A recent study that examined the nutritional content of thousands of foods with and without health-related claims found that the products that carried health claims had marginally better nutrition profiles than those that didn't. "Health claims on food packages are not about health; they are about marketing," writes nutrition professor Marion Nestle. Read more at Food Politics...


USDA puts the final touches on Michelle Obama's school-nutrition legacy

Last month, the agency announced four new rules that build on the goals of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act that set nutritional standards for foods that are sold or marketed in schools and allow free breakfast and lunch to be given to all students at schools with high poverty rates. Read more at Take Part...


Productive, protein-rich breadfruit could help the world's hungry tropics

What looks like a dimpled, bright green cantaloupe could provide much-needed nutrients for people in countries like Samoa, Haiti and Nigeria. Farmers in these countries are growing breadfruit—also called the tree potato—which packs protein, vitamins and minerals. It's a staple in Hawaii and requires less labor, fertilizer and pesticides than many commodity crops. Read more at NPR...

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