5@5: Business leaders launch campaign to cut food waste in half | Bone broth from the Keurig

[email protected]: Business leaders launch campaign to cut food waste in half | Bone broth from the Keurig

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Bigwigs have big ideas for cutting our food waste in half

Two initiative launched at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week take aim at the global food waste problem. Dave Lewis, the CEO of British retailer Tesco, is spearheading a coalition of 30 business, government and NGO leaders who are rallying behind the goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030. The second is the Rockefeller Foundation's $130 million project to reduce food spoilage in sub-Saharan Africe. Read more at Grist...


Bone broth K-Cups are the laziest way to hop on today's hottest food trend

They're not just for coffee, tea or hot chocolate anymore. LonoLife is marketing disposable, single-serve cups full of bone broth. Read more at Huffington Post...

Let them eat bulk: The success of France's cheap, zero-waste food chain

Bulk stores are apparently popping up all over France, selling snacks, oils, vinegars and dry staples sans packaging. Read more at Take Part...


Yogurt is now being marketed as 'manly'

Dannon's yogurt brand Oikos has a bold new marketing campaign that presents the yogurt in a black container, with the official NFL logo and the statement "official yogurt of the NFL." Read more at Munchies...


Grocery-store owners say city is overreaching with labor mandates

The latest municipal labor law passed by the New York City Council protects employees from being terminated for at least 90 days if a store is bought by new owners. Small, local grocers say that infringes on their rights to hire workers that meet their needs. Read more at Crain's New York...

TAGS: News General
Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.