5@5: What consumers wish 'natural' labels meant | A proposed new look for nutrition facts

[email protected]: What consumers wish 'natural' labels meant | A proposed new look for nutrition facts

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Consumer Reports: Two-thirds of consumers misled by natural labels

Womp womp womp. Nearly half of more than 1,000 U.S. adults polled by Consumer Reports in December though natural labels on food were independently verified. More than 80 percent of consumers said foods labeled with the word natural should contain no chemicals, no artificial colors, no pesticides and no genetically modified ingredients. Read more at The Hill...


Food labels revamped

Take a look at how the new nutrition label proposed by the FDA stacks up to the current one design-wise. (For starters, vitamin D and potassium are added to the label, while vitamins A and C are removed).  Read more at The Dieline...

Aldi's organic plan is great for consumers, dangerous for competition

The grocer, know for its low prices, is expanding its fresh and natural offerings, removing junk food from the checkout aisles and taking synthetic colors out of its private label products. In this already competitive space, Aldi could come in as a price leader. Read more at Forbes...


Upper Midwest farmers transitioning to organic can get aid

Minnesota and North Dakota both have programs in place that assist farmers with the three-year transition to organic production. Meanwhile, the Organic Trade Association pushes for a government-administered certification program for farmers in transition. Read more at The Big Story...


Scotland launches new organic action plan

"Organic Ambitions" lays out Scotland's plan to increase its organic farmland and sales of organic produce. Read more at the Soil Association...

TAGS: News General
Hide comments


  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.