5@5: GMO tomatoes? | Plant-based Impossible Burger hits NYC menu

[email protected]: GMO tomatoes? | Plant-based Impossible Burger hits NYC menu

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

GMO tomatoes may stay firm longer

A new research paper published in Nature Biotechnology describes a tomato that stays firm for at least 14 days after harvesting. The researchers, whose study was partially funded by Syngenta AG, used CRISPR technology to snip out part of a gene for an enzyme that breaks down cell walls. But a USDA plant molecular biologist says it's unlikely these genetically modified tomatoes would become commercial products, because the tomato market isn't big enough to justify the costs of going through the necessary regulatory process. Read more at Wall Street Journal (subscription)...


Eating the plant-derived Impossible Burger cooked by Momofuku's David Chang

The restaurant Momofuku Nishi in New York City has added the plant-based burger that mimcs meat, developed by Impossible Foods, to its menu. It will sell for around $12. This reviewer says, "The quarter-pound patty is firm and has sufficient flavor to take the place of an unseasoned piece of beef, cooked to about well-done." Read more at TechCrunch...

In Alaska's remote towns, climate change is already leaving many hungry

Warmer winters and a shift in storm patterns are changing food supply for residents of parts of Alaska. For example, hunters can't bag walruses that so many residents rely on for food. Plus thinning ice can make travel harder. Read more at NPR...


Paul Allen jumps into healthy meal delivery, backs organic meal kit startup Sun Basket

Another day, another meal kit company raising a ton of money. This time it's organic-focused Sun Basket, and the investors include Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen's Vulcan Capital, and Accolate Partners. Read more at GeekWire...


Fresh food champion Jamie Oliver signs frozen meals deal with Brazilian chicken giant

The chef who started his own "food revolution" is getting flak for signing a multi-million deal to put his name on pre-prepared chicken products made by one of the world's largest chicken producers. Oliver acknowledged the criticism but maintained that he needed to engage with big companies to effect change on a larger scale. Read more at The Telegraph...

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