5@5: Demand for organic strongest in US, Europe | Vermont survey: GMO labels don't scare shoppers

[email protected]: Demand for organic strongest in US, Europe | Vermont survey: GMO labels don't scare shoppers

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

The world's largest markets for organic products

$26.7 billion worth of organic produce was sold in the U.S. in 2013, but we have only 2.2 million hectares of land devoted to organic agriculture (compared, for example, to Australia's $1.1 billion and 17.2 million hectares). Read more at Forbes...


Study: Consumers don't view GMO labels as negative warnings

Surveys of residents of Vermont--where legislators passed a GMO labeling bill in 2014--conducted over five years indicate that attitudes toward GMOs changed in neither a positive nor negative way due to a desire for GMO labels. Read more at Food Manufacturing...


Chipotle has unseated Subway as America's healthy fast food of choice

"The fact they've convinced consumers that the product is healthy is incredible," says Darren Tristano, executive vice president at food industry research firm Technomic, in this Business Insider piece. Meanwhile, Subway's once "fresh" offerings are now seen by some as overly processed. Read more at Business Insider...


Wendy's testing antibiotic-free chicken products

The fast food restaurant isn't yet making a broad commitment to sourcing chicken raised without antibiotics but is testing it in four markets. Read more at Wall Street Journal...


UV light can kill pathogens on certain fruits

Washington State University scientists say UV light may be an alternative to chemical sanitizers for organic farmers. Read more at Science Daily...

TAGS: News General
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