5@5: Cheaper produce, healthier populations? | Minnesota to launch industrial hemp pilot project

[email protected]: Cheaper produce, healthier populations? | Minnesota to launch industrial hemp pilot project

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Slice the price of fruits and veggies, save 200,000 lives?

A computer model created by researchers from the UK and Tufts University suggested that lowering the cost of fresh produce by 30 percent could translate to as many as 200,000 fewer deaths in the U.S. from heart disease and stroke. Read more at NPR...


With feds' blessing, Minnesota to try growing hemp

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency has just granted the state a permit for an industrial hemp pilot project. Although hemp is still considered a controlled substance by the federal government, more than half of the U.S. states (not including Minnesota) have passed industrial hemp laws. Read more at MPR News...

Johnson & Johnson is just the tip of the toxic iceberg

Stacy Malkan from U.S. Right to Know advocates for tougher standards and more transparency provisions for personal care companies. Read more at Time...


Communal meat lockers could help scale up sustainable meat

The humble meat locker that was commonly adjacent to butcher shops and grocers before home freezers were common may be making a comeback. A group at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County in New York is finding interest in shared cold space from consumers who buy meat in bulk through buying clubs or CSA shares. Read more at Civil Eats...


Meet the small businesses that make giant fast-food brands possible

There's an undeniable (and fascinating) interconnectedness between big food brands and small businesses that supply them with everything from packaging to ingredients to uniforms to equipment. Read more at Eater...

TAGS: News General
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