5@5: Starbucks will donate unused packaged meals | A standard for grassfed dairy?

[email protected]: Starbucks will donate unused packaged meals | A standard for grassfed dairy?

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Starbucks to donate leftover packaged food

All of the coffee giant's 7,600 stores in the U.S. will participate in its new FoodShare program, which will donate ready-to-eat meals to food banks through partnerships with Food Donation Collection and Feeding America. Starbucks estimates it will donate 5,000 meals (and keep them from going in the trash) by the end of the year. Read more at Mother Nature Network...


Setting new standards for grassfed dairy

Pennsylvania Certified Organic debuted a third-party grassfed dairy certification in 2013, and it seems to be gaining steam. For example, it appears on Stonyfield's newest yogurt line. With no federal standard for grassfed dairy and a recently rescinded USDA standard for grassfed meat, producers are pushing for more structure around this label claim. Read more at Civil Eats...

Why Whole Foods is raising its animal welfare standards

The Global Animal Partnership last week committed to replacing all of its faster-growing chicken breeds with slower-going ones. Whole Foods, a member of the partnership, praised the move. Read more at Motley Fool...


The number of Americans who have basic healthy habits is shockingly low

According to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, only 2.7 percent of Americans get 150 minutes of exercise per week, don't smoke and have a healthy diet. Read more at Vox...


Riveting photos of migrant workers remind us who really harvests our food

The reality of working conditions of many food workers across the world is described through images. Read more at Huffington Post...


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