5@5: FDA proposes gluten-free label rules for fermented foods | Sugar avoidance prompts growth for substitutes

[email protected]: FDA proposes gluten-free label rules for fermented foods | Sugar avoidance prompts growth for substitutes

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

FDA proposes gluten-free labeling rule for fermented, hydrolyzed and distilled foods

Foods that are fermented or hydrolyzed—or contain ingredients that are—such as yogurt, pickles and cheese and carry a gluten-free label would need to meet the requirements of the existing gluten-free food labeling rule before fermentation or hydrolysis, according to the FDA's proposed rule. Manufacturers would also need to adequately evaluate the process for cross-contamination and implement measures to prevent cross-contact during the manufacturing process. Read more at Food Dive...


Consumers' focus on health triggers rise in sugar substitutes: NPD

Distribution of unsweetened, reduced sugar and sugar-free products has grown by double-digits over the last year, according to NPD Group, while shipments of stevia grew 11 percent. More consumers also look at sugar on labels than sodium and fat, the group says. Read more at Progressive Grocer...

Turmeric—the new superfood

The ingredient has been used in food, cosmetics and medicine for thousands of years, but it's recent surge in popularity is like due to its potential health effects. It's being applied widely in nutraceuticals and explored in conjunction with chemotherapeutics and antimalarial medicines in animal studies. Read more at Science Meets Food...


It's time we lifted the lid on the supermarket supply chain

Stop the Rot is a new campaign aimed at reducing food waste in UK supermarkets' supply chain by taking small steps like loosening cosmetic standards and guaranteeing orders. Read more at Huffington Post UK...


Boston startup FedWell is making pet food so pure, you'd probably eat it

After a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2014 that generated more than $20,000, Boston entrepreneur Emily Lagasse's startup sells lamb and chicken dog food made with real, fresh ingredients, and is looking to include a cricket-based dog food next year. Read more at BostInno...

TAGS: News General
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