5@5: Soda taxes among 2016 political trends | Whole Foods looks at $1B debt plan

[email protected]: Soda taxes among 2016 political trends | Whole Foods looks at $1B debt plan

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Taxes on fizzy drinks seem to work as intended

Academic evidence suggests that taxes on sugary drinks are working as intended, it also indicates that bad design can undermine much of the benefit. For one thing, relatively high taxes are needed to change consumer behavior. Various states in America have had extra sales taxes on fizzy drinks, of 3-7%. This has helped to raise revenue, but the impact on consumption has been marginal. Read more at The Economist...


War over soda taxes coming to a polling place near you

Government do-gooders and conservatives who are worried that America is becoming a nanny state have one more thing to fight about in 2016: soda taxes. Health advocates are plotting to bring voter referendums and legislation to tax. Read more at Politico...

New York is first U.S. city with salt warning on restaurant menus

A tiny salt shaker symbol that warns certain meals are high in sodium will appear, starting Tuesday, on menus in chain restaurants in New York City, the first U.S. city to take the step in an effort to combat heart disease and stroke. Read more at Reuters...


Whole Foods upsizes bond deal to $1B

Upscale grocer Whole Foods Market Inc. has doubled the size of its planned debt sale to $1 billion, according to Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services. Read more at Wall Street Journal (subscription required)...


8 details of note about the unveiled Amazon drone

Almost exactly two years after first announcing its plans to deliver packages with a drone, Amazon revealed a new prototype of one of its delivery drones. Here are some interesting revelations. From the The Washington Post...

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