5@5: Colo. A.G. investigates 'organic' marijuana| GMO-labeling efforts could run into First Amendment

[email protected]: Colo. A.G. investigates 'organic' marijuana| GMO-labeling efforts could run into First Amendment

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Colorado A.G. looks into marijuana's use of 'organic'

Attorney General Cynthia Coffman is investigating complaints that some marijuana businesses are misleading their customers. Federal rules regulate the use of "organic," but since federal law says marijuana is illegal, cannabis businesses can't legally use the term. Read more at The Denver Post ...


Report: Agricultural use of antibiotics causing effectiveness to decline

A report released today, The State of the World’s Antibiotics, 2015, found "an overall decline in the total stock of antibiotic effectiveness: resistance to all first-line and last-resort antibiotics is rising." About two-thirds of the world's antibiotics are given to livestock; in the U.S., that amount rises to about 80 percent. Read more at Modern Farmer ...


Could a First Amendment case stop GMO labeling efforts?

A Supreme Court decision regarding a Gilbert, Arizona, sign code could affect how courts look at laws that require special labels, argue a Hoover Institution fellow, an attorney and a retired law professor. Not allowing GMO labels would aid sustainable agriculture and sustainable farming, they say. Read more at Forbes ...


Congress must fully fund FDA for FSMA to be successful, officials say

President Barack Obama has asked Congress to allocate an additional $109.5 million, but the House and Senate appropriations committees have approved less than half of that increase. Acting FDA Commissioner Stephen Ostroff says receiving the entire amount is critical. Read more at Food Safety News ...


Nordic berries in high demand in Asia

Each year, Finnish forests and swamps pop out as much as 2.2 billion pounds of edible wild berries. Increasingly, those berries are being exported to China and Japan, where they are used in lotions and powders. Read more at National Public Radio ...

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