5@5: Report: Nearly half of U.S. seafood supply is wasted | Weed resistance drives more herbicide worry

[email protected]: Report: Nearly half of U.S. seafood supply is wasted | Weed resistance drives more herbicide worry

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top natural news headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Why half of edible seafood is wasted

Consumer waste is the main driver of the staggering new statistic from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future that 47 percent of the seafood supply in the U.S. is lost each year. Read more at Time...


Herbicide scrutiny mounts as resistant weeds spread in U.S.

Farmers are reporting mounting problems with weed resistance—so much so that the U.S. House of Representatives has scheduled a briefing on the problem for early December. The USDA has said that reliance on glyphosate has been a primary factor in this resistance. Read more at Reuters...

Why micronutrient deficiency is a macro-problem

Vitamins and minerals are essential for our health, yet an estimated 2 billion people across the world are deficient in micronutrients. A recent report from the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition asks: Can food fortification help? Read more at National Geographic...


Retailers overlook supply chain impact in search for product innovations

New products often add complexity and cost to supply chains—a fact that consumer goods companies and retailers aren't accounting for, according to a new report. Retail forecasting software firm Terra Technology found in a new survey that there are 32 percent more new products on shelves today than in 2010, yet sales of companies surveyed has only grown by 4 percent. Read more at the Wall Street Journal...


The (fake) meat revolution

In a New York Times op-ed, columnist Nicholas Kristof writes that new meat alternatives on the market appeal not just to vegans but also to carnivores looking for healthier, cheaper more sustainable food. Read more at The New York Times...

TAGS: News General
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