Natural Foods Merchandiser

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Peaceful produce
A lycopene extract has been shown in a small study, published in the January issue of the American Heart Journal, to help lower blood pressure. Lyc-O-Mato, sold by LycoRed Natural Product Industries, lowered systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood-pressure reading) by an average of 10 points and reduced the diastolic reading by four points. The effect was strongest for people with readings that were only borderline high. Researchers at the University of the Negev in Beer Sheva, Israel, theorized that lycopene's antioxidant properties were responsible for the improvement.

People who get their protein from vegetables also have lower blood pressure, according to a study published in the Jan. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. The 4,680 middle-aged people from four countries who participated in the study kept detailed food diaries and had blood pressure readings taken eight times. Those who ate the most vegetable protein had the lowest blood pressure. In this instance, however, researchers suggested that the amino acids present in vegetable proteins might be responsible. There was no direct correlation between eating meat and having high blood pressure.

The wild bunch
Wild Alaskan seafood is poised to benefit from recent questions surrounding farmed, imported and Atlantic fish. And the Alaskan Seafood Marketing Institute is helping matters by releasing a series of bold, colorful, theater-size posters that retailers can display to entice consumers toward their wild Alaskan salmon, halibut, cod, king crab and black cod. ASMI also has available in-ice signs, static clings, recipe cards and sign toppers, all with fun and whimsical graphics. For more information, visit

Natural Foods Merchandiser volume XXVII/number 3/p. 88

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