New York City's True Made Foods wins top honors at Food+City

New York City's True Made Foods wins top honors at Food+City

True Made Foods, a New York City startup that makes vegetable-based condiments such as ketchup and barbecue sauce that are lower in sugar, won Food+City's Gold Prize earlier this month.

True Made Foods' co-founders Abe Kamarck, left, and Kevin Powell, right, accepting the Gold Prize from Robyn Metcalfe at Food+City.
True Made Foods' co-founders Abe Kamarck, left, and Kevin Powell, right, accepting the Gold Prize from Robyn Metcalfe at Food+City.

True Made Foods, a New York City startup that makes vegetable-based condiments such as ketchup and barbecue sauce that are lower in sugar, won Food+City's Gold Prize earlier this month.

In the second annual Food+City Challenge at the University of Texas at Austin, 20 finalists participated in a public showcase and a fast-pitch contest. As Gold Prize winners, True Made Foods received $30,000; two scholarships for the Food Business School's Food Venture Lab; and prizes from Moo.com, Barnraiser and MWR Legal.

The challenge is designed to focus on identifying and encouraging startup businesses, products and processes to provide new solutions addressing food problems globally. The finalists' innovations included an energy bar made of crickets, using soldier fly grubs to break down food waste, and an app that learns a consumer's food preferences.

The four winners of the $5,000 Silver Prize were The Food Corridor, an online marketplace for food entrepreneurs to find commercial kitchen space, based in Fort Collins, Colorado; Agruppa, a service in Latin America that leverages technology to empower small foods vendors in low income neighborhoods by providing them with fruits and vegetables at wholesale prices; Garbage to Garden, a self-funded, market-based curbside composting company in Portland, Maine; and Real Food Solutions, maker of the Anchor Nutrition Bar, a Boston-based company that uses existing clinical research to create food-based remedies for everyday ailments, including nausea.

Regrub, which uses soldier fly grubs to make fertilizer or feed from food waste, won the People's Choice Award. Two Texas A&M freshmen founded Regrub.

The remaining top 10 finalists were St. Louis Metro Market, Steak TzarTzar, Tastegraphy and Tree Adoption Uganda.

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