Fish Blockchain

[email protected]: Blockchain grows for sustainable fish certification | Cultured, vegan chicken coming soon

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Food lobby group's rolls further contract as Hershey and Cargill depart

The Hershey Company and Cargill are the latest food giants to part ways with the Grocery Manufacturers Association as a raft of companies have dropped the association amid a shakeup in the food industry. At least eight major companies have now bailed on GMA, the largest food industry association in Washington, including heavyweights like Campbell Soup Co., Nestlé, Dean Foods, Mars, Tyson and Unilever. Read more at Politico …

 

One of Europe’s largest meat companies is betting big on cell-cultured, vegan chicken

One of the largest poultry producers in Europe is teaming up with an Israeli clean meat company to get cell-cultured chicken to market within three years. The partnership between Tel Aviv-based SuperMeat and the German poultry company PHW Group marks a important milestone for the nascent clean meat industry. It is also the latest sign that global meat industry players—well aware of a growing interest among consumers for alternative protein sources—are prepared to coalesce around new food technologies to get cost-competitive cell-cultured meat out of the laboratory and into the grocery store. Read more at Quartz …

 

Are you eating sustainable fish? Blockchain may provide the answer

Eco-conscious diners can rely on restaurants to tell them their fish comes from a sustainable source, but it can be hard to know for sure. That’s why a new certification system, launched by blockchain company Viant and the World Wild Fund for Nature, is intriguing: It provides a step-by-step way to verify a fish’s journey from the ocean to the market to the dinner plate. Read more at Fortune …

 

‘Raw water’ is the latest health craze. Here’s why drinking it may be a bad idea

Proponents of the “raw water” movement are banking on selling people on the idea of drinking water that contains the things they say nature intended without the chemicals, such as chlorine, often used in urban water treatment processes. In some areas of the country, including the West Coast, it has become a high-dollar commodity — water captured in glass bottles and sold straight to you.  Read more at The Washington Post …

 

U.S. News' 40 Best Diets Overall

U.S. News' annual ranking of diets is out.  Read more at U.S. News and World Report …

TAGS: General
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish