[email protected]: Hampton Creek's rebrand | Chefs fuel a Rust Belt food renaissance

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Artisanal branding grows up

Food tech darling Hampton Creek has rebranded its line of Just products, including spreads, cookies and cookie dough. Its old craft paper labels, according to CEO Josh Tetrick, just didn't resonate with bargain shoppers. Designer Sean Wolcott led a redesign of the brand, starting with the packaging, which now features the name "just." prominently—less as a modifier (like Just Mayo) and more as a self-standing brand—along with a single-color image of the respective product. Read more at Co.Design...

 

How food is bringing the Rust Belt out of its decades-long recession

The opening of Chef Michael Symon's upscale bistro Lola in 1997 triggered a movement that would take hold not just in its home of Cleveland but in an entire region of the country. Cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh have bounced back from deindustrialization and recession with vibrant food scenes—thanks in part to being located in one of the most productive agricultural regions in the country. Read more at Thrillist...

 

Scientists call on Price, FDA to keep Nutrition Facts deadline

As food industry trade groups lobby to delay the implementation of the new Nutrition Facts labels until 2021, more than 40 scientists and researchers wrote a letter to HHS Secretary Tom Price and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb to stick to the July 2018 compliance date. "Any delay in the compliance deadline deals a blow to the health of our nation, especially to vulnerable populations that disproportionally suffer from obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and tooth decay—chronic diseases associated with the overconsumption of added sugars," the letter says. Read more at Wisconsin Gazette...

 

Has this Silicon Valley startup finally nailed the indoor farming model?

Vertical farming startup Plenty, which uses heirloom seems to grow greens and herbs in a former electronics distribution center in South San Francisco, says its method of growing allows it to be more efficient—energy, labor and cost-wise—than traditional farms and other indoor farming operations. With a purpose to scale up local food production and shorten the time it takes to deliver fresh food to customers, it's garnered $26 million in investment. Read more at Fast Company...

 

Weeds and herbicides put an organic farm at odds with neighboring growers in Oregon

The longstanding issue is whether Azure Standard, a 2,000-acre organic farm in Sherman County, Oregon, is letting its weeds spill over into neighboring property, and whether the government should intervene. Read more at OPB...

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