5@5: How climate change threatens the morning cup of joe | A new way to raise crickets for sustainable protein

[email protected]: How climate change threatens the morning cup of joe | A new way to raise crickets for sustainable protein

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Wake up! Climate change threatens world's coffee supply, report says

Warming temperatures could reduce available coffee farmland by 50 percent, as well as increase the threat from diseases and pests that target coffee beans, according to a new report from the Australian nonprofit Climate Institute. Read more in The New York Times…


Edible crickets can be reared on weeds and cassava plant tops

Some weeds and agricultural byproducts can provide proper nutrition for reared crickets, Swedish researchers have found. That means crickets can become a sustainable meat alternative and provide cheap protein more easily. Read more in Science Daily...


Gardening as a kid indicates that you’ll eat fruits and veggies as a college student

Gardening as a child does more than get the kid some sunshine and exercise, according to a new University of Florida study. Turns out, those kids eat more fruits and vegetables in college, when their buddies are likely binging on fried and fast foods. Read more at Modern Farmer…


5 African foods you thought were American

Many foods we consider to be Southern came to the United States from Africa through the Atlantic slave trade. The restaurant at the new National Museum of African American History and Culture seeks to highlight these ingredients and dishes. Read more at National Geographic…


Apple's new doctor makes YouTube videos on diet and mental health

The technology giant hired a medical doctor who captured attention with a series of YouTube where he explains common medical problems. Dr. Mike Evans, also known as "DocMikeEvans", says the future of health care is a combination of in-person visits and advanced technology. Read more at CBC News…

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