Seventh Generation unbleached toilet paper

[email protected]: Seventh Generation acquired by Unilever | EPA chimes in on glyphosate-cancer conversation

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Unilever buying Seventh Generation

The Vermont-based maker of laundry detergent, diapers and other "green" household products is led by former Unilever and Burt's Bees exec John Replogle. Details of the deal weren't disclosed but, Fortune's unnamed source estimated its value between $600 million and $700 million. Read more at Fortune...


EPA weighs in on glyphosate, says it doesn't cause cancer

Since the International Agency for Research on Cancer said last year that the herbicide Roundup is a probable carcinogen, other agencies and experts have reached the opposite conclusion. Now, the EPA has issued its report, which will be reviewed in October. Read more in NPR…


Is there a government conspiracy against Hampton Creek?

You probably know how the American Egg Board protested when Hampton Creek labeled its eggless dressing "Just Mayo." But did you know that Big Food is lobbying Congress to ban Freedom of Information Act efforts to expose their cozy relationship? Read more in Food Safety News…


... Till proven guilty

The difference between a no-till field, which isn't plowed but likely involves the use of herbicide, and one that is tilled and left bare is obvious after a significant rainstorm. Watch the video at Grist...


Outcry erupts over Miami Beach’s pesticide spraying to curb Zika

Concerned Miami Beach residents and environmental protesters are coalescing around the issue of pesticide spraying—a last-ditch approach to curb the Zika-carrying mosquitoes—and raising concerns about its safety and efficacy. They are asking for a two-week moratorium on spraying. Read more in The New York Times… 

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