5@5: Whole Foods moves into low-income neighborhoods | Dumping dairy

[email protected]: Whole Foods moves into low-income neighborhoods | Dumping dairy

Each day at 5 p.m. we collect the five top food and supplement headlines of the day, making it easy for you to catch up on today's most important natural products industry news.

Whole Foods sets up shop in low-income neighborhoods

In an area of Chicago with few fresh, healthy eating options, a new Whole Foods Market store has opened its doors. But some are skeptical of whether residents of the lower-income neighborhood of Englewood will be willing to pay for gourmet natural goods. In the last three years, the retailer has also opened stores in Detroit and New Orleans. Read more at The Wall Street Journal...


Dairy farmers pour out 43 million gallons of milk due to surplus

New USDA data revealed that farmers dumped out or fed to animals enough milk to fill 66 Olympic swimming pools in the first eight months of the year, Wall Street Journal reported, as dairy surplus has "reached record levels." Read more at Time...


Frutarom snags seventh acquisition of the year

Nardi Aromas, which Frutarom bought for $1.6 million, specializes in natural traditional Brazilian flavors and herbal extracts for the carbonated and alcoholic beverage markets. Read more at Baking Business...


Sweet potato vitamin A research wins World Food Prize

Three scientists have won $250,000 and the prestige of a World Food Prize for developing a vitamin-enriched sweet potato to address malnutrition in the developing world. Read more at BBC...


Soylent is telling customers to throw away its food bars

The "food bars," made with soy protein, oats, algal flour, isomaltulose and lots of other stuff have apparently been giving a number of customers gastointestinal distress, to the point where Soylent has halted selling them and advised customers to throw them away. Read more at Fortune...

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