Expo Japan preview

Spotlight shines on second-largest nutrition market

Natural Products Expo Japan will be staged for the first time next month β€” but it?s not a new event! Expo Japan 2005 will expand on the successful Functional Foods Exhibition, organised for the past seven years by Japan?s leading publisher for the health & nutrition industry, Health Business Magazine Co (HBM).

New Hope Natural Media?s partnership with HBM on Natural Products Expo Japan ensures further internationalisation of the event, inclusion of additional product sectors, expanded buyer outreach and a world-class educational programme.

As the second-largest market in the world for nutrition and natural products, Japan represents a huge growth opportunity for overseas companies. Building on a strong base of supplements and food exhibits β€” and with the inclusion of natural personal care, raw ingredients and alternative healthcare β€” Expo Japan provides an opportunity to capitalise on a rapidly growing market. The show will feature 200 exhibiting companies, with three quarters from Japan.

The event has traditionally been a forum for educating manufacturers and retailers on the latest ingredient science, regulations, and marketing and sales information. Last year, in addition to 30 organiser-programmed sessions covering everything from overviews and regulatory updates on the Korean and Chinese markets, to the latest science on co-Q10, 40 primarily ingredient-focused exhibitor-presented seminars took place.

Natural Products Expo Japan
When: May 17-19, 2005
Where: Tokyo Ryutsu Center
Contact: www.naturalproductsjapan.com

Some exhibiting companies

  • Aloe Wellness (Australia)
  • Capsugel (Japan)
  • Daiwa Pharmaceuticals (Japan)
  • GDS Group (US)
  • Irwin Naturals (US)
  • Maruzen Pharmaceuticals (Japan)
  • Maypro Industries (Japan/Taiwan)
  • Minato Pharmaceuticals (Japan)
  • Morikawa Kenkodo (Japan)
  • Now International (US)
  • Tasly Group (China)
  • Toyo Hakko (Japan)

Conference highlights
The Coenzyme Q10 Market in Japan
The size of the markets; issues regarding production; is co-Q10 here to stay?

Alpha-Lipoic Acid
Recent regulatory changes; Japan-sourced vs China-sourced raw materials; uses in weight-loss products.

The Japanese FOSHU market
Obtaining FOSHU certification and its value to manufacturers; proposed changes to Japan?s supplements and nutraceuticals regulatory framework.

Special sessions for overseas companies
The Japanese market is growing at 10 per cent annually by some estimates, yet market penetration by overseas companies lags. Special sessions, simultaneously translated into English, have been designed to take some of the mystery out of the market for foreign manufacturers:

Getting Started in Direct Selling & MLM for Nutritional Products
Hideyuki Iwasawa, Japan Direct Marketing & Distribution Association Where to start; what products are in demand; regulatory issues; general overview of the MLM market; introductions to people from the JDMDA, who can help get overseas companies started.

Winning Through Mail Order Selling in Japan
Masayuki Kakio, Japan Direct Marketing Association
Distinct from direct selling/MLM, mail order is a huge and growing distribution channel in Japan. The overall size of the market, getting started, products in demand, and who you need to know to begin selling your overseas products through mail order in Japan will be covered.

The Marketing of Health Foods & FOSHU Foods in Japan
Hitoshi Onaka, Yano Research Institute
An overview of how nutritional and natural products are marketed and sold, including market data and everything you need to know about FOSHU.

Selling Natural Products in Japan
Tadaaki Kimura, Health Business Magazine Japan
What?s hot in Japan today and how to capitalise on trends and product gaps in the existing market. The chairman of Japan?s leading nutrition industry newspaper and a long-time importer of natural products addresses issues foreign manufacturers need to know.

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