Oliver vs. Oz, part 2: Comedian roughs up the TV doctor, again (Video)

If Dr. Oz has a nemesis, it’s probably some lawyer yet to named. We already know who his comic nemesis is: John Oliver.

The host of HBO’s “Last Week Tonight” took aim at the doctor Sunday, three days after Oz spent much of his show on the attack against a group of doctors who wrote a much-publicized letter to Columbia University asking that Oz be dropped from the faculty. Oliver’s rant comes 10 months after Oz was the target of the comedian’s 16-minute epic comic screed against the supplement industry.

He only needed four minutes this time.

After calling the doctor’s response to recent events “pathetic,” Oliver questions Oz’s statement that because the word “Oz” is bigger than “Dr.” in the show’s logo, it makes it clear that his is not a “medical show.” “It’s not a medical show because the word doctor is small?” Oliver asks.

He also ridicules Oz’s assertion that the doctors who wrote to the university impinged on his freedom of speech. “You are scientifically wrong about that as you are about so many things,” Oliver says, before explaining that the amendment “absolutely protects you to say whatever you like on it (his show), just as it protects my right to say what I think about you on mine, which is this: You are the worst person in scrubs who has ever been on television.”

But perhaps the most painful jab was Oliver describing the doctor as “the admittedly handsome ringmaster of a middling mid-afternoon snake oil dispensary.”

Oliver spares few words for Oz’s charge that the doctors behind the letter have questionable ties to industry, saying “that might be true, might well be true, but none of that answers the substance of the accusations that he’s a quack who sells viewers horsesh!t dressed up as medicine.”

These are damning words -- perhaps too harsh, possibly unfair -- but they are the words that 82,000 YouTube viewers had seen as of Tuesday afternoon.

TAGS: News General
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