Buggy byproducts the next source for omegas?

Buggy byproducts the next source for omegas?

The oil leftover when protein is extracted from insects may be a sustainable source of omega-3 fatty acids, according to new research.

We know omega-3s can help with many health ailments, but omegas from bugs? Insects may prove to be a sustainable source of the fatty acids, according to a new study.

A team of researchers from the Netherlands explored a range of omegas that were byproducts of extracting protein from different insects. These oils are normally thrown away. The researchers analyzed omegas from mealworms, beetle larvae, crickets, cockroaches, grasshoppers and soldier flies. Yum.

"All the oils smell differently, some nicer than others,” said doctoral student Daylan Tzompa Sosa, lead author of the study, in a Wageningen University release. Sosa demonstrated that the insect oil can be extracted in an environmentally friendly way, yielding a high quality oil. The study appears in Food Research International and was noted on sciencedaily.com.

Next, the team is working on figuring out what to feed the insects for optimal oil production. They’ll also test to determine any potential risks to humans and animals who consume it.

Can’t wait for insect omega supps? You can get your bug fix today with chips made from cricket flour. Check out Chirps Cheddar, a find at the Winter Fancy Foods Show.

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