New film chronicles path to clean, cultured meat

The complicated journey to produce meat—without the animal.

What do you get when you combine a cardiologist, a tissue engineer, a stem cell biologist and a whole lotta moxie? You get Memphis Meats, the San Francisco-based company that is figuring out how to produce meat—real meat—without killing animals. New documentary "Meat The Future," directed by filmmaker Liz Marshall, chronicles the trials and tribulations of growing meat from cells in order to feed the global demand for meat, which is expected to double by 2050.

The film closely follows CEO and cofounder of Memphis Meats, Dr. Uma Valeti. While a cardiologist, Valeti injected stem cells into his patient's hearts with the hope of growing heart muscle. If we can do that, why can't we grow food that's better for us and better for the planet, he wondered. The company has already produced (and eaten!) cultured meatballs—real meatballs that take the animal, and 90 percent of the carbon emissions typically produced from factory farmed beef, out of the equation.

Also in the film, Bruce Friedrich, executive director of the Good Food Institute and cofounder of New Crop Capital, a VC firm invested in supporting companies innovating in the "clean meat" category.

Check out the trailer for "Meat The Future," and stay tuned for this feature-length documentary to make waves in the natural food industry. 

 

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