Solae and Novozymes File Patent Application

Solae and Novozymes, through their joint development agreement, have filed a patent application for the production of isolated soy proteins that are modified to enhance sensory characteristics and physical properties to expand use in a broad set of food products.

Soy protein is an ingredient in a wide variety of food products such as infant formula, meal replacement drinks and sports bars and beverages. In 2007, there were over 1,400 product launches with soy protein (Source: Mintel Global New Products Database). The current size of the soy protein market is estimated at over 600,000 metric tons.

"Our new soy protein ingredients will work in a broader range of food applications, making it easier for consumers across the globe to choose healthy, great tasting foods," said Torkel Rhenman, Solae CEO.

With this new technology, soy protein will be more acceptable and accessible as food manufacturers will be able to increase soy protein inclusion levels and introduce soy protein to new products. Through these new soy proteins, consumers will find no bitter or beany taste as well as improved mouthfeel and texture. They will be better-tasting and will appeal to broader, mainstream consumer base.

This innovative technology will deliver on consumer benefits through key components of the TL1 enzyme used to hydrolyze the protein. The enzyme is selective as it cleaves the protein's polypeptide 'backbone' at given amino acid residues; for TL1, the selectivity is at arginine and lysine cleavage sites. "The protein profile of this product, in combination with proprietary process technology, enhances the functional characteristics of the protein without contributing negative flavors like bitterness," said Jonathan McIntyre, Solae vice president of innovation and technology.

Process examples describe additional components of this invention, resulting in process claims encompassing the conditions, equipment, and processes required to economically and productively yield protein ingredients relevant to the market place. Product examples describe fields of use for this invention, as a food ingredient or component of a food product like a beverage or food bar, typically used in combination with other food ingredients like sweeteners or vitamins and minerals. The majority of the examples involve soy proteins, though claims detail other vegetable and animal proteins that could yield other novel ingredients, e.g., canola protein isolate.

The intent of Solae and Novozymes patenting jointly is to allow our respective customers protected access to the various aspects of this invention, in accordance with the joint development agreement in effect between the two companies. This patent is the first tangible outcome of the partnership as announced on October 13, 2008.

Solae is the world leader in developing innovative soy-based technology and ingredients for the food, meat and nutritional products industries. Solae provides solutions that deliver a unique combination of functional, nutritional and economic benefits to our customers. At Solae, the journey to innovation begins with nature. We take one of nature's best resources, the soybean, and create nutritious and great-tasting ingredients. Our goal is to provide solutions for today while innovating for tomorrow. With more than 1,000 products used by more than 3,500 customers, Solae's soy ingredients are enjoyed by consumers around the world in products such as baked goods, beverages, nutrition bars, meats, vegetarian meals and much more. Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, with annual revenue exceeding $1 billion, the company was formed through an alliance between Bunge Limited. For more information, visit

Novozymes is the world leader in bioinnovation. Together with customers across a broad array of industries, we create tomorrow's industrial biosolutions, improving our customers' business and the use of our planet's resources. Read more at

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