Solgar supports nutrigenomics

The US arm of multinational premium supplements manufacturer, Solgar Vitamin and Herb, has entered into an arrangement with a nutrigenomics company, GeneLink, that will see Solgar marketing individually tailored supplements in health stores across America using the New Jersey company's patented gene testing methods.

The supplements, called Nutrigenomx, will be marketed as "advanced genetically-guided nutritional supplements" that are formulated in response to the genetic make-up of individuals.

"We are very pleased to have completed this groundbreaking agreement with Solgar," said Monte Taylor, CEO of GeneLink. "By combining Solgar's leadership in nutritional sciences with GeneLink's 10-plus years of research and advancements in consumer genomics, we have created an ideal marketing relationship for each of our companies. A personalised approach to wellness has become an important trend in health care and we are proud to partner with Solgar in this exciting development."

GeneLink and Solgar will be the first companies to offer a proprietary genetically guided dietary supplement system when the supplements arrive on shelves in early 2008.

Rand Skolnick, President and CEO of Solgar Vitamin and Herb stated: "It has always been our mission to provide consumers worldwide with premium quality, innovative, science-based nutritional products that enhance overall wellness. We recognised GeneLink's leadership in consumer genomics, genetic testing and its rich intellectual property portfolio when we created our relationship. This cutting edge nutritional system will allow Solgar to provide consumers a unique and powerful personalised strategy designed to help maintain optimal health."

Personalised nutrition is seen by many as a major trend and was highlighted in a recent report by Business Insights. Author Mark Tallon noted: "As companies drive home the message that supplement dose should be related to bodyweight, personalised nutritional products will emergeā€¦ the one-size-fits-all approach to supplementation is dying out."

However the European Nutrigenomics Organisation said it may be decades before nutrigenomic science was strong enough to be referenced in public health care.

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