After 28 Years, New Age Journal Changes Its Name to Body & Soul

Premiere Issue Debuts this Month

BOSTON, MA - In 1974, a small group of dedicated editors and writers created a new magazine to help each of us rethink the way we live. They called it New Age Journal and it was remarkably ahead of its time. Mythologist Joseph Campbell; spiritual teacher Ram Dass; integrative medicine proponent Andrew Weil, M.D.; women’s health pioneer Christiane Northrup, M.D.; renowned author Deepak Chopra; and life coach Cheryl Richardson all appeared in New Age Journal long before their ideas became popular with the general public.

"Today, more and more people are incorporating what used to be alternative practices into their daily lives. They are eating more organic foods, practicing yoga, meditating, investing according to their values, and using herbal remedies," states Publisher David H. Thorne. "One could say New Age has come Of Age. The magazine has succeeded in its mission and now is the time to broaden our appeal." In view of contemporary interests and trends, New Age Journal will be relaunched under the name Body & Soul, beginning with the March/April 2002 issue. As was the case with New Age Journal, Body & Soul will be a bi-monthly publication with two annual special issues. The magazine’s new website,, launched February 20.

"Changing the name of a well-respected magazine is a big step," says Jennifer L. Cook, Editor-in-Chief. "However, we believe Body & Soul captures more effectively the heart of our editorial mission. I’m pleased to report that response from our readers about the name change has been very positive." Cook continues, "New Age always focused on its readers’ physical and spiritual wellbeing. As Body & Soul, we will continue to report on the latest ideas and trends that will help our readers to live more balanced, meaningful lives."

In addition to Body & Soul, David Thorne also publishes Dr. Andrew Weil’s Self Healing newsletter.

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