AHPA board approves requirement regarding labeling of DMAA

AHPA board approves requirement regarding labeling of DMAA

The American Herbal Products Association's (AHPA) Board of Trustees has approved a trade requirement regarding the labeling of products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine. Also the board approved the appointment of John Doherty and Bill Carter, Esq., as co-chairs of the AHPA Sports Nutrition Committee.

SILVER SPRING, Md.(August 8, 2011) -- The American Herbal Products Association's (AHPA) Board of Trustees has approved a trade requirement regarding the labeling of products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine. The board acted due to this ingredient, also known as DMAA, being listed on product labels as derived from "geranium oil" or geranium stem or geranium extract. The board approved this action at its most recent meeting, held last month.   

The trade requirement, which becomes effective on January 13, 2012, requires that AHPA members do not label 1,3-dimethylamylamine, whether identified by this name or any synonym, as geranium oil or as any part of the geranium plant, whether by the common name of geranium or by the botanical name of any plant known as geranium.  

Interested parties can view the trade requirement for labeling of 1,3- dimethylamylamine (see "Trade Requirement XX") here.   

1,3-Dimethylamylamine, also known as 1,3-dimethylpentylamine; methylhexaneamine (MHA); methylhexanamine; methylhexamine; 4-methyl-2-hexanamine; and 2-amino-4-methylhexane, was an inhaled nasal-decongestant drug synthesized by Eli Lilly and Company in 1971 and known as Forthane. More recently, DMAA has been used in dietary supplements for weight loss and bodybuilding.

It is sometimes referred to as geranamine due to a single report of it naturally occurring in an essential oil distilled from geranium leaf.

That study, by Ping et al. (Ping Z, Jun Q, Qing L. A study on the chemical constituents of geranium oil. Journal of Guizhou Institute of Technology 1996;25:82-85), which identified the presence of DMAA in geranium, described a gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of essential oil obtained from steam distilling the minced, air-dried leaf of fresh Pelargonium graveolens. More than 40 compounds were reportedly detected, and 31 of them were assigned identities based on automatic computer matching to a MS spectral library.

"Nothing in the new AHPA trade requirement prevents accurate labeling of any compound that is in fact derived from geranium plant materials," said Michael McGuffin, AHPA's president. "But any label that identifies DMAA as sourced from geranium, or from any other natural source, would need substantiating evidence to support it."        

Also at its July meeting, the board approved the appointment of John Doherty and Bill Carter, Esq., as co-chairs of the AHPA Sports Nutrition Committee. Doherty is director of regulatory affairs for Iovate Health Sciences. Carter is general counsel for Bodybuilding.com. Doherty and Carter replace Erica Stump, Esq., formerly of Bodybuilding.com, who left the company in early April.

For more information on this AHPA trade requirement, contact Steven Dentali, Ph.D., at 301.588.1171 x103 or viaemail.

About the American Herbal Products Association 

The American Herbal Products Association is the national trade association for and the voice of the herbal products industry. AHPA is comprised of domestic and foreign companies doing business as growers, processors, manufacturers, and marketers of herbs and botanical and herbal products, including foods, dietary supplements, cosmetics, and non-prescription drugs. Founded in 1982, AHPA's mission is to promote the responsible commerce of herbal products.    

MEDIA CONTACT: Frank Lampe, Director of Communications, 720.398.8172, [email protected].

SOURCE: The American Herbal Products Association, www.ahpa.org.

 

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