AHPA endorses senators' anabolic steroid act

AHPA endorses senators' anabolic steroid act

Proposed legislation would create criminal and civil penalties of up to $2.5 million and 10 years in prison for the manufacture, sale and/or distribution of substances defined as anabolic steroids.

Sens. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., introduced the "Designer Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2012," (SB 3431) which would amend the Controlled Substances Act to more effectively regulate anabolic steroids.

The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) has endorsed this legislation and has sent a letter of support to both senators stating that the "expanded controls on these substances that would be implemented by your legislation would protect consumers by better ensuring that these are not misrepresented as legitimate dietary supplements, when clearly they are not."

The proposed legislation would, among other things, create criminal and civil penalties of up to $2.5 million and up to 10 years in prison for the manufacture, sale and/or distribution of substances defined as anabolic steroids, including drugs and a number of hormonal substances, created or manufactured with the "intent of producing a drug or other substance that either promote muscle growth; or otherwise causes a pharmacological effect similar to that of testosterone; or ... marketed or otherwise promoted in any manner suggesting that consuming it will promote muscle growth or any other pharmacological effect similar to that of testosterone."

Additionally, the legislation would add more than 25 new substances to the current lists of defined anabolic steroids, and would revise the process whereby the U.S. attorney general could add other substances to this list.

Herbs and other botanicals, as well as concentrates, metabolites, extracts of and constituents isolated directly from herbal ingredients are specifically excluded from the bill's definition of an anabolic steroid.

 

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